Monthly Archives: February 2014

The Gold Standard for Raising Kids

A couple of weeks ago I brought to you a question that was asked by Jones, to parents, in the book “The Noticer Returns” by Andy Andrews.
What is the Gold Standard for Raising Children?”

Today, I would like to share with you what I believe to be the answer to that question.

Jesus actually set the standard over 2000 years ago and is recorded in the following verses of the Bible.

Matthew 22:37-40
“Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love The Lord thy God with all they heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind.
This is the first and great commandment.
And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.

Yes, it is as simple as that. We must teach our children to love God and love others. If every parent in the world can accomplish those two things, what else is there to do? The world that we live in would be as God originally intended it.

How to teach our kids to love God.

We must be an example to our children by first loving God ourselves and then teach them His Word. Deuteronomy chapter 6 says it well.

Deu 6:5 And thou shalt love The Lord thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might.
Deu 6:6 And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart:
Deu 6:7 And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.

God and His Word should be the center of everything that we do. We must first love God with all of our heart, soul and might and then we must teach this to our children in everything that we do; in the home, outside the home, when we go to bed and when we get up.

Pray with you kids.
Read the Bible together.
Go to church more than once per week.
Lead a God centered home form the time they are born until they are grown and they will get it.

How to teach our kids to love others.

Matthew 7:12 Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.

Luke 6:31 And as ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise.

These two scriptures are often referred to as the Golden Rule by which we should live. The best way to teach our kids to live by this rule is to to live it ourselves. We must show them by example.
Look for every opportunity that you can to reinforce this and teach it to them. Life is all about choices that we make each and every day; at home, at school, at work, and with friends. The opportunities to teach them to treat others as they would want to be treated are endless.
Read some more of Luke chapter 6. Jesus gives us some great examples of how we should treat others.

The standard is set. It has been for a long time. We just have to live it and teach it. The future is in our hands; in our kids, and we as parents have the responsibility to show them how to live.

If you found this helpful please take a moment to share it with others.
We can’t do it alone. In order to make the biggest impact we must all work together with one purpose.

Love God and love others.

(Enter your email address in the “Follow Me” link to the right and future posts from me will go straight to your inbox. Thank you and God bless.)


200,000 miles!!

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I am proud to say that our car has made it to the 200,000 mile mark.
Now I pray that God will help it to make it to 300,000 miles and beyond.

This Ford Taurus and our middle son are both 14 years old.
We bought it 3 weeks before he was born.
It’s been nicknamed “The Big Red Car” for a long time now thanks to The Wiggles.

I would be awesome if this car could stick around long enough to help our kids through high school and college. Oh the stories it would be able to tell.
I lay my hands on the dash just about every day and ask God to help it last another 10 years.

Why am I so excited about a 14 year old car hitting 200,000 miles?
Because I have no car payments and do not ever want one again.
We have been driving this car for over 10 years now debt free and that is why I thank God every day for making it last. He is good!

Do you have a car that has made it to the 200,000 mile mark or beyond?
Please share your story by commenting below.
What kind of car is it?
How old and how many miles?

We will be looking for another used car soon as our kids make it to driving age and would love your recommendations.

Thank you.


Poll for Parents: Need Your Comments Please

Please take a moment to answer the following question…

What result or character trait or would like to see in your child as he/she or grows into an adult?

Start your answer with “To…”

example: To be hard working

example: To have integrity

Please answer in the  comment section below.  You may give more than one or give one now, then come back again if you think of another.  There is no limit to the number of answers.

The answers that you give will be compiled into a list and shared for everyone’s benefit.

Thank you so much for taking the time to respond.


Your Answers: The Results Parents Are Hoping For

“In order for all of us to agree upon a consistent way of parenting—a standard—we must first identify and then agree upon the ultimate results we wish to see in our children when they become adults.” – Jones, The Noticer Returns by Andy Andrews

I asked for your help in coming up with some results that we would like to see in our kids as they grow into adults. Here is what you said…
(Not listed in any particular order)

To have compassion
To be kind
To be loving
To be a christian
To be independant
To be aware
To believe in God
To be honest with themselves
To be Non-addicted
To be responsible
To seek God in everything they do
To be patient
To be the best you can be
To make wise choices
To have a good work ethic
To love their spouse
To be thankful
To be positive
To be healthy
To treat others at you want to be treated

Thank you to everyone that took a moment to respond.
It would be hard to believe that any parent would disagree with anything on this list. Thus, it would seem fair to assume that we can agree on the results that we want to see in our kids. The real challenge is to see if it is possible for parents to agree on a standard or best method for achieving those results.

In my next post I’ll lay out a standard which I believe, if followed, will have a great chance of leading to the results that every parent hopes to see.

What do you think?


What Is The Gold Standard for Raising Children? (Part 2)

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In the book, The Noticer Returns, by Andy Andrews, Jones is leading a parenting class. He asks those in the class three questions.

1) “As parents, do you believe that you are doing the very best you can?”
2) “If society’s best parents—the most loving, the most determined, the most concerned parents—are all raising their children by setting their sights on a target called ‘doing the best we can,’ is anyone aiming at the same thing?”
3) “What do today’s parents agree is the gold standard for raising children?”

In response to the first question, most truly loving and caring parents would say that, of course, they are doing the best that they can and then may even respond with their own question, “What’s wrong with that?”
There is nothing wrong with doing the best that you can, but is that good enough? If everyone is truly doing the best that they can, then what is it that everyone is “doing”? Are we all doing the same thing or is everyone just raising their kids how they see fit.
Is there one standard by which everyone parents?

Here is an excerpt from the book that tells us how Jones answers this question…

Suddenly the old man was animated. He rose from the chair and passionately declared the conclusion to which he had come. “You see, my friends,” he said, “by not addressing the issue of an accepted standard, today’s parents have defaulted into an uncomfortable agreement with each other. They have agreed that there will not be a standard for raising our children.
“One set of parents teaches their daughter to say ‘yes ma’am’ and ‘no sir.’ Another couple contends that standard of behavior to be a matter of opinion.”
“One parent demands her boys dress in trousers that are belted at the waist. Her boys must wear their ball caps with the bill pointed to the front, and those caps are to be removed, with no exceptions, when indoors. That parent’s next-door neighbor, on the other hand, might have entirely different rules about what clothes her children are allowed to wear and how they are allowed to wear them. Meanwhile, society lives with increasingly discouraging results.”
Kelli spoke. “So you are saying there are no standards?”
“Quite the contrary,” Jones replied. “I am saying that there are many different standards. That is essentially why there is a vast array of parenting books published every year, each touting new methods or different ways to measure a child’s success. There are scores of classes—most larger than this one—all being taught by a countless number of people who claim to be experts in the field of parenting.”

Jones goes on in the book with an analogy of planting a fruit tree and raising it. Most trees that you go buy at the store come with instructions on how to plant and care for that tree in order for it to produce good fruit. If you follow those instructions your chances of growing a tree that produces good fruit are much better than if you just stick it in the ground and ignore it.
Those instructions are the standard by which many people came together and agreed would be the best way to raise a fruit tree and get good results.

As parents, we have been given an enormous challenge in raising our kids because when they were born they did not come with an instruction manual. There are many books and lots of different opinions out there, but society has not yet came to an agreement on a single standard by which everyone should raise their children.

About the only standard that I can think of that civilized society has come up with is that parents should send their kids to school for 13 years.

Is that good enough?
Does there need to be a standard for raising children?

I would love to hear your thoughts on this.

This topic has struck a chord in me and I plan to write more about this in the coming weeks. As parents, the future is in our hands and it all starts with how we raise our kids.

Excerpts From: Andrews, Andy. “The Noticer Returns.” Thomas Nelson, 2013-07-01. iBooks.
This material may be protected by copyright.

Check out this book on the iBooks Store: https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewBook?id=619416934


What Is The Gold Standard For Raising Children? (Part 1)

In Andy Andrews’ latest book, “The Noticer Returns”, Jones is leading a class on parenting.
He asks those in attendance what the gold standard is for raising children.
It ends up being a very challenging question to answer and Jones’ response will really make you think.
Before I share his response with you, I would like to give you the opportunity, just as I did while reading the book, to ponder the question and see if you can form an answer.

So, is there a gold standard for raising children? If so, what is it?
In order to answer this question, it helps to understand what a “standard” is.

According to Merriam Webster a “standard” is something that is regularly and widely used; well-established and very familiar; something established by authority, custom, or general consent as a model or example.

We have standards for many things in this world…

In sports we have standards for the size of the playing fields or courts.
In schools we have standards for passing class and moving on to the next grade.
There are standards for how to dress in sports as well as some schools and even work.
Science has all kinds of standards by which to test and proof theories.
Think about all the standards in the financial world.
What about all the standards that have been put in place for driving on the roads? (colors, shapes and lines)

There are endless examples of standards that we have created for ourselves and they are needed.
A world without standards would lead to chaos and confusion. Everybody would just be doing their own thing and making up rules as they go.

So, “What is the standard for raising children?”
Is there a well established and widely used method of raising children that has been set by some authority as a model or example?

Should we all just do the best we can and see how things turn out or is there a standard to follow?

In part 2, I will reveal what Jones said in the book and then provide my own take on it.
If you have read the book already, then you may have some idea where I’m going with this and the challenge that has been presented to us. If you have not read the book yet, I highly recommend it.

The Noticer Returns by Andy Andrews

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Thank you and God bless.

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